Let's talk about "squatting below parallel"—a critique of Starting Strength

Let's talk about "squatting below parallel"—a critique of Starting Strength

"Squat below parallel," while a useful guideline in many circumstances, need not be a primary goal for many athletes and should be applied judiciously—not dogmatically. 

How good is good enough?

How good is good enough?

The question, for a coach, is how much diversion from the ideal we ought allow before integrating corrective exercises. On one extreme are coaches who believe that the movement must be brought as close to the ideal as possible through corrective exercises before any load is introduced or progressed. On the other side are coaches who believe that practice and cues are sufficient to weed out any technical errors over time, and that time spent on corrective exercise would be better spent on mindful practice of the exercises.

Simple Programming is Good Programming

Simple Programming is Good Programming

Good programming, even with a variety of modalities, does not need to be complicated. Progression should be planned through periodization and tested through repetition. When deficiencies arise, accessory work can be added to correct them, then systematically removed from the program as they lose their necessity.

Even a coach needs a coach

Even a coach needs a coach

Sometimes, it can take a little humility to accept that you need guidance, particularly if you're a seasoned athlete. But a coach not only saves you a lot of time and guesswork doing your own program design, but also provides a more objective eye when assessing your technique and where your program needs to be modified. Being your own worst critic—especially in a constructive manner—is much harder than it sounds. 

Understanding Periodization and Why You Need It

Understanding Periodization and Why You Need It

Without periodization, you're leaving your progress to chance. Maybe those random workouts, scattered rest days, and unplanned intensity will pay off; but there's a very good chance you'll shortchange yourself and fail to make anywhere near the progress you could with a more structured program.